Do You Still Clip Coupons? Do You Ever Get Any Of Them Online?


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ninjapoodles
I grew up clipping every single food coupon from every single paper we could find. We’d ping our neighbors and relatives if we saw something worth clipping that didn’t have a limit on the number of coupons. We often times walk into the grocery store with a coupon for every item. My mom was very good at frugal shopping. I actually remember, back on my first job as a paperboy, my mother even proposed I put a note in all the newspapers if there were good deals to call me back; I had to draw the line somewhere though, cause Mom would be all for it, to my embarrassment! :)

So it has been pretty engraved in the minds of folks for years, and seemed to have fallen off in the 90′s but rumor has it coupons are making a comeback. A recent study by comScore, an Internet information provider that tracks consumer behavior, found that 53% of consumers say they regularly visit brand Web sites to find promotions. I admit, I still have a tendency to look for the food deals when I see them – Where have I looked?

Coupons.com is the big dog I see the most ads about – I think it has the best advertising and I’m sure the domain name doesn’t hurt. It has a ton of grocery printable coupons for major household brands such as Johnson & Johnson, Unilever, Pepsi, General Mills, and Kraft. You can view available savings by category or by brand, print area-specific coupons by entering your zip code, and get an estimate of how much money they will save you.

I’ve stopped at CouponMountain.com a time or 2 specifically because they don’t require registration or a lengthy sign-up process in order to access coupons. They have coupons for all the big stores (Walmart, Toys R US, Home Depot). They also have discount codes for airfares, hotel reservations, car rentals, and online dating. And if you’re a fan of a specific store, you can subscribe for email notifications whenever special offers from that store are available.

CurrentCodes.com has a lot of well-known online stores like Barnes and Noble, Staples, and Amazon.com have a place within their shopping cart for a “coupon code” that gives a percent or dollar amount off your purchase. If you don’t know the code, you don’t get the discount, so find a coupon. A lot of times you can find these secret discount codes and coupon codes listed on in a google search, but the problem with these sites is that they’re usually personal homepages and they don’t keep the lists up to date very often.

Dealcatcher.com has a feature called SundaySaver that compiles the weekly sales circulars and Sunday ads into a similar webpage. Just enter your state to see all of the stores that had ads that week—click on a store to see the deal. You won’t find quite as many categories of coupons on Dealcatcher as on Coupons.com. Nonetheless, it has been known to cross my screen a time or two.

FatWallet.com is a big one, but it has a lot of ads, and is difficult for me to navigate. I don’t dig on it very much because of that. I like a site that has everything I want right out in the open. Check it out, but don’t spend too much time figuring it out.

All in all, I’ve got to admit, I visit them less the more my salary goes up, and time goes down; but they are very good places to find deals to live the frugal way if you’ve got the time!

Filed Under: adviceCompensationDebtFrugalReaders Requests